What a strange day I had yesterday. One minute I was enjoying exceedingly strong coffee at Workshop Coffee, the next I was doing this:

Sewing bunting. At Kensington Palace, no less.

Don’t believe me? Here’s a view of the fortified wall that protects Will and Kate’s private apartments. From the inside. Pretty grim, isn’t it. It’s crying out for the living wall treatment.

The bunting is the work of my friend Natalie Ryde, who was an artist in residence at the Palace in the run up to its reopening to the public earlier this year. She produced some beautiful, characteristically colourful work based around historic fragments of wallpaper revealed during renovation of the palace.

Doesn’t she look sweet? This is her “Stop taking pictures and get sewing bunting, punk!” smile.

Don’t know whether it was something in the coffee, but by the end of the day we’d finished two fat spindles of bias tape and worked our way through most of the giant piles of fabric triangles. I was ready for a nap on the very inviting Kensington Palace cushions, and wondered idly if I could maybe sneak one out.

The bunting, produced by local primary school children during workshops with Natalie, is destined for the “Jubilee – a view from the crowd” exhibition opening at the Palace on the 24th of May, exploring Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee of 1897.

When I first moved to Siem Reap I fully intended to make good use of my newly found free time. I had big plans to do some screenprinting; I’d just finished a course in Singapore and was looking foreword to experimenting with the technique.

But circumstances have dictated otherwise. There have been guests, tenants and now construction work; I’ve been scared to mark my mother’s pristine wooden floors; I’ve struggled to find the few missing supplies I needed to get going. Where do you get strong UV lights, table glue or screen hinges in Cambodia?

So many excuses. Last week a friend brought me a lino cutting tool from Singapore, so I got a few erasers and cut up a few stamps. It’s good to remember sometimes simple is best.